Sterling Silver, Bronze, & Stone Jewelry

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TERRI LOGAN

Terri uses river rocks, fossils, agates, slate, and other stones along with brushed sterling silver and/or bronze to create her pieces.

The designs shown on this website are examples of Terri's work but may not always be what we have in stock. Our inventory and the stones change frequently so please contact us for information on our current selection.

Most pieces are available in different stones and some earring styles are available in either pierced or clip.

Artist Statement

Becoming a jeweler/metalsmith was less than a direct path for me. I was a psychotherapist for 18 years before I decided to become a full-time artist.

Like most of us. I began making art around the age of three. By nine, I knew I had some talent, but wasn't until my twenties that I discovered sculpture.

Narrowing my academic pursuits became a difficult task since I hate to refuse myself anything. I was fortunate to secure a double major. I was a second year BFA sculpture student with a child psychology co-major when my studies were interrupted. Economy and efficiency led to the decision to graduate early with a BA from Indiana University. In graduate school, I was able to unite my love for art and psychology by receiving my clinical degree, MAT, Masters of Art Therapy, from Wright State University.

Thus beginning a wonderful professional career, a general private practice in which I utilized the arts in many forms of treatment, diagnosis and prevention.

Therapy was an intense and demanding profession, and for me, it had a life-span. With burnout approaching, I was three again! I was making art again!!!

I'm now 8 plus in jeweler years and still discovering my identity. My work is based on formal concerns, design principles and function. Coming from a fine arts perspective, function is a new and important dimension for me.

Coming from a psychological perspective, I make jewelry because of the intimacy the function allows. I use metal and stone (river rock) because they are inherently strong materials with a rich historic value and intrinsic links to our civilization. Their abundant character, separate or in relation to each other, offers infinite possibilities as a language.